FAQ: What Happens After I Apply for Disability Insurance?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

By deciding to purchase disability insurance, you have taken a positive step in protecting future income in the case of a debilitating accident. Whether you have an individual long-term disability policy that you purchased from an insurance agent or a group disability policy provided by your employer, what happens next is the same. In this blog post, Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive discusses what happens after you apply for disability insurance.

The first thing that happens is that you will receive a phone call from the insurance company to review some of the questions on the application and to have you re-answer the medical questions. This may seem redundant since you may have already answered the same questions, but his step ensures that the underwriter has all of the information he/she needs and that there are no discrepancies on your application. In many cases, the next step is to take a medical exam. The exam consists of taking your height and weight, blood pressure and pulse and obtaining a urine and blood sample. If you apply for a very high amount of coverage, and/or you are over a certain age, you may be required to do a resting EKG. The insurance company covers the cost of the exam.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.

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FAQ: Do I Need Landlord Insurance?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

Maybe you’re moving up to a bigger home and holding on to your former residence as a rental property. Or maybe you’ve tried to sell your home without success. Whatever the reason, if you’re thinking about renting out your home, you need to look into landlord insurance. A comprehensive landlord’s rental property insurance policy will protect your investment property, so that you can rent it out with confidence. In this post, Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive explains the importance of a landlord insurance policy for rental property owners.

Your rental property is an important investment and can provide a steady source of income. But all sorts of hazards, from lightning to kitchen fires, could damage your property—and your wallet. Landlord’s insurance provides all the coverage you need to protect your property from damage, and you from legal and personal liability.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.


FAQ: What does ‘Licensed, Bonded and Insured’ Mean?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

If you’ve ever looked for a business to perform any type of homebuilding, renovation or repair project, you’ve come across the term “licensed, bonded and insured.” In this post, Long Island Insurance Executive, Gregg S. Marcus, explains what it means to be licensed, bonded and insured. The federal government contracts require contractors to be bonded and insured, to reduce the financial risk. House cleaning services, moving companies and pet sitting companies are bonded and insured in case any thievery, accident or other damage caused by the company.

Licensed
For certain professions, a license is necessary to show that you’re competent and permitted to conduct business in the city, municipality, or state in which the license was issued. Generally, to be licensed in a field means that the person has completed a certain amount of education and training, been rigorously tested on this knowledge, and been approved by the state to perform the type of work on which they were tested on. In most cases it also means that the person must keep up with current information and advances within his field through continuing education in order to maintain the license. Consumers can look up a business’ performance history in most states through the Better Business Bureau using their license number.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.


FAQ: What is the Difference between Workers’ Compensation and Disability Insurance?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

“This is a question that a lot of people, including many small employers, don’t know the answer to,” says Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive. “Many are under the impression that disability insurance and workers’ compensation are the same thing. Although they are similar in benefits, there are fundamental differences.” By understanding the differentiation between the two, you will be more prepared in the case of a major financial loss due to inability to work because of injury.

Workers’ Compensation
Essentially, workers compensation insurance is a “no fault” claim. This means that in exchange for an employee’s waiver of the right to file a suit against an employer, the employee’s medical expenses are paid by the employer’s insurance company until the situation is resolved and the employee returns to work.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.


Is Removal of a Tree That Fell on my Roof during a Storm Covered by Homeowner’s Insurance?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

With Hurricane season still in full swing, chances are we will get hit with at least another bad storm this year. It is important to know if your homeowner’s insurance covers issues like these. If a tree falls onto your roof during a storm, your homeowner’s insurance policy WILL cover the repair of your roof as well as some, if not all, of the cost of tree removal. However, had the tree not hit your roof, your insurance may not cover any of the tree removal charges. In this post, Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive, explains what steps to take after a tree falls on your home’s roof during a storm.

ROOF DAMAGE
The first thing you need to do is contact the insurance company to report the damage. You should do this right away! Many insurance providers have 24/7 claims hotlines; so don’t hesitate to call them at any hour to let them know about any storm damage. The insurance company will want to send an adjuster out to your property to conduct an inspection, but you should also keep a record of the damage by taking pictures and/or videotaping the relevant area of your home.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.


FAQ: Do I Really Need Renter’s Insurance?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

A fire can destroy an apartment in only minutes. A tornado can destroy one in just seconds. These scenarios or even a robbery in your apartment can end up costing you thousands of dollars in order to replace all of your personal belongings. Think you don’t have enough property to justify the expense of your own insurance? The value of your belongings may shock you. “Your sporting goods, electronics, computers, clothes and furnishings may be worth more than you realize,” says Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive . “It is wise to check into renter’s insurance before an unexpected event like this happens.”

Your landlord’s insurance policy covers damage to the building structure and the landlord’s property from a fire, storm or theft, but this policy will not cover your property or liability. Renters insurance (also known as a HO4 policy) covers you against specific types of losses – such as damage from lightning, fire, storms, vandalism or theft – so that you can replace or repair your property in the event of an incident. If you had to pay out of pocket to replace items such as laptops, televisions, clothing and other expensive possessions, this could cost upwards of $20,000.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.


FAQ: Why Did My Insurance Company Not Renew My Homeowner’s Insurance Policy?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

An insurance company can cancel or choose not to renew your homeowner’s insurance policy for many different reasons. In some circumstances, it is completely preventable by the homeowner. However, in many other situations, it is completely out of the hands of the homeowner. This is a major issue because having a homeowner’s insurance policy on your home is a non-negotiable with the bank when financing your home. In this post, Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive, explains why an insurance company may choose to not renew a policy.

Preventable reasons that a homeowner’s insurance policy may be canceled or not renewed include:

  • Non-payment of insurance premiums
  • Giving incorrect information or non-disclosure of important information about the home to the company
  • Failing to act in accordance with safety guidelines (i.e. not removing things like pools and trampolines).

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.