FAQ: What Happens After I Apply for Disability Insurance?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

By deciding to purchase disability insurance, you have taken a positive step in protecting future income in the case of a debilitating accident. Whether you have an individual long-term disability policy that you purchased from an insurance agent or a group disability policy provided by your employer, what happens next is the same. In this blog post, Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive discusses what happens after you apply for disability insurance.

The first thing that happens is that you will receive a phone call from the insurance company to review some of the questions on the application and to have you re-answer the medical questions. This may seem redundant since you may have already answered the same questions, but his step ensures that the underwriter has all of the information he/she needs and that there are no discrepancies on your application. In many cases, the next step is to take a medical exam. The exam consists of taking your height and weight, blood pressure and pulse and obtaining a urine and blood sample. If you apply for a very high amount of coverage, and/or you are over a certain age, you may be required to do a resting EKG. The insurance company covers the cost of the exam.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.


FAQ: What is the Difference between Workers’ Compensation and Disability Insurance?

Here is an excerpt from a new blog post at GreggMarcus.com:

“This is a question that a lot of people, including many small employers, don’t know the answer to,” says Gregg S. Marcus, a Long Island Insurance Executive. “Many are under the impression that disability insurance and workers’ compensation are the same thing. Although they are similar in benefits, there are fundamental differences.” By understanding the differentiation between the two, you will be more prepared in the case of a major financial loss due to inability to work because of injury.

Workers’ Compensation
Essentially, workers compensation insurance is a “no fault” claim. This means that in exchange for an employee’s waiver of the right to file a suit against an employer, the employee’s medical expenses are paid by the employer’s insurance company until the situation is resolved and the employee returns to work.

To read this post in it’s entirety, click here to visit the Gregg Marcus official website.